common without stint


common without stint
A frequently used, but erroneous name for the unmeasured right of common; that is a right of common which has not yet been admeasured or apportioned. See 3 Bl Comm 239. It was also called "common sans nombre."

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

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