preamble


preamble
A prefatory statement most aptly illustrated by the fifty-two words at the beginning of the Constitution of the United States. A clause in a statute, following the title and preceding the enacting clause, explanatory of the reasons for the enactment and the objects sought to be accomplished. 50 Am J1st Stat § 152. A statement at the beginning of a municipal ordinance by way of a finding of fact by the council and the reasons, purpose, or occasion of or for the enactment. Continental Oil Co. v Santa Fe, 25 NM 94, 177 P 742, 3 ALR 398. The preamble to the Constitution of the United States indicates the general purposes for which the people ordained and established the Constitution, but the preamble itself has never been regarded as the source of any substantive power conferred on the Federal Government or on any of its departments. Although one of the declared objects of the Constitution, as stated in the preamble, was to secure the blessings of liberty to all under the jurisdiction and authority of the United States, no power can be exerted to that end by the United States unless, apart from the preamble, it is found in some express delegation of power or in some power to be properly implied therefrom, in the body of the Constitution. Jacobson v Massachusetts, 197 US 11, 49 L Ed 643, 25 S Ct 358.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Synonyms:
(especially of a legislative act), , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • preamble — pre·am·ble / prē ˌam bəl, prē am / n [Middle French preambule, from Medieval Latin preambulum, from Late Latin, neuter of preambulus walking in front of, from Latin prae + ambulare to walk]: an introductory statement (as to a contract); esp: the… …   Law dictionary

  • Preamble — Pre am ble, v. t. & i. To make a preamble to; to preface; to serve as a preamble. [R.] Feltham. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Preamble — Pre am ble, n. [LL. praeambulum, from L. praeambulus walking before, fr. praeambulare to walk before; prae before + ambulare to walk: cf. F. pr[ e]ambule. See {Amble}.] A introductory portion; an introduction or preface, as to a book, document,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preamble — (n.) late 14c., from O.Fr. preambule (13c.), from M.L. preambulum, neuter adjective used as a noun, properly preliminary, from L.L. praeambulus walking before, from L. prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + ambulare to walk (see AMBLE (Cf. amble)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • preamble — *introduction, prologue, prelude, preface, foreword, exordium …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • preamble — ► NOUN ▪ a preliminary statement; an introduction. ORIGIN Old French preambule, from Latin praeambulus going before …   English terms dictionary

  • preamble — [prē′am΄bəl, prē am′bəl] n. [ME < MFr preambule < ML praeambulum, neut. of LL praeambulus, going before < L praeambulare, to precede < prae , before + ambulare, to go: see AMBLE] 1. an introduction, esp. one to a constitution, statute …   English World dictionary

  • Preamble — A preamble is an introductory statement in a document that explains the document s purpose and underlying philosophy. When applied to the opening paragraphs of a statute, it may recite historical facts pertinent to the subject of the statute. It… …   Wikipedia

  • preamble — UK [prɪˈæmb(ə)l] / US noun [countable] Word forms preamble : singular preamble plural preamble formal 1) an introduction to a document, speech, or report explaining its purpose 2) something that happens or comes before something else The fighting …   English dictionary

  • preamble — pre|am|ble [priˈæmbəl US ˈpri:æmbəl] n [U and C] [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: préambule, from Late Latin praeambulus walking in front ] formal a statement at the beginning of a book, document, or talk, explaining what it is about preamble… …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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