intent to steal


intent to steal
The intent or purpose which a thief has to deprive another of his goods. The intent of one taking personal property without the consent of the owner to deprive the owner permanently of his property or its value. 32 Am J1st Larc § 36.

Ballentine's law dictionary. . 1998.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • steal — Verb: To commit larceny. Daugherty v Thomas, 174 Mich 371, 140 NW 615. To take without right or leave, with intent to keep wrongfully, the goods of another. Grooms v State, 85 Fla 413, 96 So 296. Noun: A taking by larceny or theft. In the broad… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Steal — (st[=e]l), v. t. [imp. {Stole} (st[=o]l); p. p. {Stolen} (st[=o] l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stealing}.] [OE. stelen, AS. stelan; akin to OFries. stela, D. stelen, OHG. stelan, G. stehlen, Icel. stela, SW. stj[ a]la, Dan. sti[ae]le, Goth. stilan.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • steal — vt stole, sto·len, steal·ing [Old English stelan]: to take or appropriate without right or consent and with intent to keep or make use of see also robbery, theft Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • steal — I. verb (stole; stolen; stealing) Etymology: Middle English stelen, from Old English stelan; akin to Old High German stelan to steal Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to take the property of another wrongfully and especially as a… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • steal — This term is commonly used in indictments for larceny ( take, steal, and carry away ), and denotes the commission of theft, that is, the felonious taking and carrying away of the personal property of another, and without right and without leave… …   Black's law dictionary

  • specific intent — The mental purpose to accomplish a specific act prohibited by law. The most common usage of specific intent is to designate a special mental element which is required above and beyond any mental state required with respect to the actus reus of… …   Black's law dictionary

  • To steal a march — Steal Steal (st[=e]l), v. t. [imp. {Stole} (st[=o]l); p. p. {Stolen} (st[=o] l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stealing}.] [OE. stelen, AS. stelan; akin to OFries. stela, D. stelen, OHG. stelan, G. stehlen, Icel. stela, SW. stj[ a]la, Dan. sti[ae]le, Goth.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • You shall not steal — is one of the Ten Commandments,[1] of the Torah (the Pentateuch), which are widely understood as moral imperatives by legal scholars, Jewish scholars, Catholic scholars, and Post Reformation scholars.[2] Though usually understood to prohibit the… …   Wikipedia

  • furandi animus — Intent to steal …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Larceny — In the United States, larceny is a common law crime involving theft. Under the common law, larceny is the trespassory taking (caption) and carrying away (asportation, removal) of the tangible personal property of another with the intent to… …   Wikipedia